Jeffers Foundation

ASTRONOMY

Astronomy

November, 2017

November 4-6 at 7:45 pm CST
November 4-6 at 7:45 pm CST
The stars in this illustration belong to the constellation Taurus. Taurus' brightest star, Aldebaran, is absent because the Moon will pass in front of it between 7:09 and 8 pm on the evening of November 5. This "occultation" of Aldebaran will be the last one visible in the Midwest until December 5, 2033!

Morning Stars

Venus is visible very low in the eastsoutheastern sky until just after mid-month when it disappears into the Sun's glare. Try to spot the very close conjunction (0.3 degrees separation) of Venus and Jupiter four-and-a-half degrees above the east-southeastern horizon 45 minutes before sunrise on November 13. Mars is visible all month long, about 23 degrees above the southeastern horizon one hour before sunrise. The Moon passes Mars on November 24. Jupiter is too close to the Sun to observe during the first ten days of this month. Thereafter it can be found about eight degrees above the southeastern horizon an hour before sunrise. The Moon passes Jupiter on November 16.

Evening Stars

Mercury is an evening star this month, but never rises high enough above the horizon to be seen. Observe the occultation of Taurus' brightest star, Aldebaran, by the Moon on November 5. The star will seem to disappear at 7:09 pm and reappear at 8 pm. Observe Saturn very low in the southwest one hour after sunset until Thanksgiving Day. The Moon passes Saturn on November 20.

Sun Declination

PHENOMENA

4th, Full Moon (Hunter's Moon) - 12:23 am

5th, Moon perigee; 224,583 miles - 6:20 pm

5th, Aldebaran 0.05 degrees north of Moon (Occultation 7:09-8:00 pm) - 7:35 pm

5th, Central Standard Time resumes - 2:00 am

10th, Last Quarter Moon - 2:36 pm

12th, North Taurid Meteor Shower peak - 4:39 am

13th, Venus 0.25 degrees north of Jupiter - 2:24 am

17th, Leonid Meteor Shower peak - 10:56 am

18th, New Moon Descending Cold (Ojibwe) - 5:42 am

21st, Moon apogee; 252,359 miles - 12:54 pm

23rd, Mercury at greatest eastern elongation (22.0 degrees) - 5:11 pm

26th, First Quarter Moon - 11:03 am

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